One of the little-mentioned casualties of the move away from CRT technology for our TVs and computer monitors was light gun games. As everyone who lives in the gaming world knows, light guns don’t work on modern TVs. They need to be able to track the CRT beam; no CRT beam, no workee.

Nintendo’s Wii had a sort of solution with its Wiimote, which used an IR sensor bar, but as anyone who has tried to play House of the Dead on the Wii can attest, it’s not what you’d call accurate.

Enter Andy Sinden, inventor of the Sinden Lightgun, a light gun that works with modern TVs and is way more accurate than IR-based solutions like the Wiimote. As I understand it, it’s basically a camera in a gun shell that recognises the on-screen border created by the driver software and uses that to work out where you’re pointing it, with exceptional accuracy. As far as Windows and Linux is concerned it appears to be a mouse, which means that it can be used with a wide variety of games, platforms and environments. So, you can run your old arcade gun games in MAME, and play them on your PC or Raspberry Pi or whatever, on your modern TV, with a proper gun.

I was one of the backers of the original Kickstarter campaign, and so I received my Sinden Lightgun yesterday. I think general release / order fulfilment is January or so.

The hardware itself is reminiscent of the Saturn light gun. It’s not what you would call a premium product – it is injection moulded rather than 3D printed, but the plastics have a slightly scuffed and overly shiny look to them reminiscent of a cheaper child’s toy. For the money, I would have liked a slightly more high-end finish and a bit more weight to it, although that probably wasn’t practicable given the small production run for the Kickstarter. It doesn’t feel fragile though, the trigger is microswitched (a nice touch) and the other buttons are well-placed and feel decent enough. Crucially, the USB lead is very long (~5m I think?), so you can stand well back from larger screens. So … not blown away like I was by the Spectrum Next, but not bad at all.

The software is not, in its current form, going to win any UI design awards. It’s in beta still, so that’s not necessarily unexpected, but it is … basic, shall we say. No doubt that will improve with time. It is after all just a beta.

The software has also proven somewhat unstable for me – it frequently throws exceptions when I launch it. Again, it’s a beta, and Andy is clearly a capable guy, so no doubt that will improve.

The biggest issue I faced was setting up MAME, because I’m really not familiar with it and the learning curve is, shall we say, steep. Honestly though I didn’t make my life easier by not reading the Sinden Lightgun wiki properly.

All of these niggles fell away pretty quickly once I got it working though. Damn, this thing is fun. I’d forgotten just how much I miss light gun games. Time Crisis, Terminator 2, Operation Wolf, Lethal Enforcers … ahhhh. They all work great.

Gun game nirvana

So … yeah. It’s not quite ready for prime time, perhaps. But the core technology is sound and works well. I can certainly see it being supported out of the box by MAME, RetroArch and so on in the future, and if it catches on then, who knows? We could be looking at a whole new generation of light gun games. Imagine a new House of the Dead or Virtua Cop game using the latest Unreal Engine. Now you’re talking.